Avoid the Pitfalls of a Commercial Lease

Commercial LeaseIf you’re thinking about entering into a commercial lease contract, you should carefully consider these important aspects of your decision to avoid frustration, unnecessary costs and hindrance to your business.

Zoning and Planning Permit

Before signing a lease, make sure your business meets zoning and planning permit requirements. Zoning regulations may impose restrictions on the type of business activity you intend to carry. If you fail to comply with the restrictions, the council may make you stop using the premises regardless of your leasing arrangements. If that wasn’t bad enough, imagine the cost of vacating the premises, especially if you have already spent money on outfitting it, and relocating elsewhere, assuming you can find something suitable on a short notice. And what are the chances of escaping the breach of contract terms in your lease with the landlord?

Lease Period

Aim to negotiate a long term commercial lease with options to renew at the end of the initial term. A long term commercial lease will facilitate the development of an established business and increase its value should you decide to sell it.

Do not rely on the assumption that the landlord will be willing, or even able, to renew a short term lease. Being a business themselves, they may have other plans for the premises once your term comes to an end or even decide to jack-up the rent seeing how valuable the property is to your business and you would, in their estimation, rather pay up than vacate and relocate.

Mortgagee’s Consent To Lease

If the property you intend to lease is mortgaged, you should (although you’re not required to by law) secure consent from the property’s mortgagee to lease the property to you. You and your landlord may be bound by a contract but no legally binding relationship exists between mortgagee and you. What it means is—should the relationship between mortgagee and your landlord end, the mortgagee will be in a position to terminate your lease and ask you to vacate the premises unless you have their consent to lease (see the Land Title Act 1994 (Qld) s66, s184).

Tenancy Interference

Ensure the lease does not allow the landlord to terminate your tenancy before the end of the lease. Watch out for refurbishment clauses in your contract—you don’t want to find out that a refurbishment clause opened a door to a full scale renovation of the premises, driving away your customers and disrupting your business.

Multiple Occupancy

If you intend to lease in a shared building, make sure the most recent plan is included with the lease. This document should show exactly what area of the building will be leased to you as well as specify your allocated car parking lots and other common areas such as entries and exits, toilets or kitchens. Without details like these a possible dispute resolution will be difficult to achieve.

Professional Advice

Overlooking even a small detail of a commercial lease can be very expensive. For an entrepreneur, it should make perfect sense to hedge against a possible loss before it happens by engaging an experienced solicitor to look after your interests and ensure every aspect of your commercial lease is properly evaluated.